Explanation of Duties

Please keep in mind that these descriptions are the "ideal," so be prepared and ready to reduce the duties of each to a manageable level. You should be able to perform your duties comfortably, so prioritize if you have to and cut down to the essentials.

You should also feel free to add a little something extra or try something new. Toastmasters is the place to be creative and experiment; if your experiment succeeds, good for you. If it doesn't turn out the way you had hoped, at least you learned something and no harm was done.

Meeting Roles and Responsibilities

The following are some general guidelines on the various roles we include in our club meetings.

Most of the titles below are each links to a PDF of the Encinitas Toastmasters guideline for the role. The PDF is the most up-to-date official Club role description.

Greeter

Please click on the above link for the description.

Call to Order (Sgt at Arms)

This is usually done by the Sergeant at Arms. This call sets the tone for the meeting, so it should be lively and energetic. If possible, do something related to the theme. Get the meeting off to a good start, interacting with the audience if possible. Ask everyone to stand, then lead the pledge of allegiance to the flag, or select someone to lead the pledge, and then introduce the presiding officer. 

Presiding Officer

Please click on the above link for the description.

Jokemaster

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Toastmaster

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Grammarian

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Timer

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Ah Counter

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Videographer

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Educational Tip

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Table Topics Master

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Host

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Speaker

Preparation is essential to success when you are the speaker. Every speech should be well-prepared and rehearsed to ensure quality. Remember, club members learn from one another's speeches. Every speaker is a role model. Before the Meeting Contact your evaluator ahead of time to inform him or her which manual speech you will be giving. Discuss your speech goals (both those in the manual and your personal goals) and any concerns you may have. Remember to bring your manual to the meeting so that your evaluator can fill in the Evaluation Guide for your speech. Give the Toastmaster of the Day an introduction, including the following information:

  • Name of manual, speech number, speech name.

  • Speech title.

  • Requested time.

  • Formal speech objectives.

  • Your personal speech objectives.

  • Anything else you want your audience to know.

Get in the habit of writing your own introduction. This is a useful thing to do for any conference or meeting you attend at work or on the outside in which you will be introduced by someone else.  

Example 1: Today Molly Brown will be giving manual speech #3, "Organize Your Speech." The time is 5-7 minutes and her title is "Backpacking in the Hetch Hetchy Valley." The objectives are (1) organize your thoughts into a logical sequence and (2) have a clear opening, body and conclusion. Molly would also like you to check for nervous mannerisms and whether she establishes eye ontact with the entire room.  

Example 2: Today Molly Brown will be giving Speech #1, "The Technical Briefing," from the Advanced Manual on Technical Presentations. The title is "Clean Water--What Happens When You Turn On the Tap?" and the time is 8-10 minutes. The objectives are (1) using a systematic approach, organize technical material into a concise presentation and (2) tailor the presentation to the audience's needs, interests, and knowledge levels. Molly will be giving this speech to an audience of high school girls interested in environmental engineering. Please pretend you are a high school science class and judge Molly's content based on that knowledge level. Molly would also like to know whether she engages your enthusiasm and interest, and how to do this better for high school students. 

During the meeting

Arrive early to make sure the room and any equipment you will be using are ready. Take a seat near the front of the room. Before the meeting starts, give your manual to your evaluator. After you are introduced, take control of the meeting by shaking hands with the Toastmaster of the Day. As you begin your speech, acknowledge the Toastmaster and the audience. Plan your speech closing as carefully as your opening; it's the finishing touch that will bring on the applause. Wait for the Toastmaster of the Day at the lectern, shake hands to return control of the meeting, and return to your seat. During the evaluation of your speech, listen intently for helpful hints that will assist in building better future talks.

After the Meeting

Get your manual from your evaluator, and discuss any questions you may have concerning your evaluation. Have the Vice President Education (or the senior officer present) initial the Record of Assignments in the back of your manual.

Evaluator

Please click on the above link for the description.

Helpful Videos on how to Evaluate Speeches

Toastmasters - Giving An Evaluation That's Worth A Darn
Chris Swanson, Memorial Hospital Toastmasters

Speech Evaluation Workshop (4 parts)
Harry from Emerging Speakers Toastmasters

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edkInK635eE&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RxgZk3ms9w&feature=related 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lKJ7ZWDUV4&feature=related 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvIT4ZNlaZY&feature=related

General Evaluator

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Closing Inspiration

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Back Up Speaker

The back up speaker is simply a member who presents a speech in the event that a prepared speaker cancels for the evening. Members should always have a prepared speech in their "back pocket." It comes in handy when you are asked by the Toastmaster (or your supervisor) to give a speech in a moments notice. Like any other role, let the Toastmaster know if you don't have a speech ready as a back up for a cancelled speaker.